HVAC/Roundup August 2019

August 28, 2019 / by Jennifer Brosius

Have you heard about our mobile app Trakref V3? This month we went behind the scenes with the Developer, CARB reached out for feedback for their refrigerant management rules, and the EPA proposed changes to its own set of regulations. It’s time for another HVAC/Roundup - our monthly review of the news and topics we found important to HVAC/R and refrigerant management and compliance over the last few weeks:

Your New Mobile App Trakref®️ V3: Meet the Developer!

Trakref® V3 is available now! It’s the latest evolution of our user-friendly refrigerant management tool, enabling technicians in the field to more easily and efficiently enter service records and coordinate with system owners. Our latest mobile solution is built to streamline the refrigerant management process, speeding up technicians’ ability to capture data in a simple, intuitive, and timely manner. In the end, service teams get paid faster, and system owners stay in compliance with the ever evolving system of federal, state and local regulations. We thought this would be a great opportunity to sit down with the developer behind the mobile app, our own Arnaud Phommasone. 

Click here to read more!

CARB Gathering Input on Proposed Requirements

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is working on creating new requirements intended to help the state achieve the emissions reduction goals of SB1383, aimed at reducing high global warming potential (GWP) HFCs in stationary refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. They held a live webinar this month with the purpose of gathering feedback from the people who would be directly affected by these measures, and to get their input on how to make them feasible.

Click here for the run-down

State of Climate Change Programs Across the US

The struggle between state and federal legislation has been waged since the founding of the country. The ever evolving patchwork of climate change regulation is evidence of that fact. The US EPA recently began to relax the requirements for the states. So many of them have begun to set their own policies in place. Specific legislation is in place in six states, and more than 30 others have some type of regulatory action that affects every HVAC/R owner, installer & servicer in the US. Here's a look at how it's impacting the HVAC/R and Refrigerant industry.

Click here for the details

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Other news trending this past month...

Ban on refrigerant, which kicks in Jan. 1, could force homeowners to replace air conditioners

You’ve had 2 years to prepare. Are you ready? Effective Jan. 1, 2020 the United States will no longer produce or import the refrigerant chemical HCFC-22 or more commonly as R-22 or Freon.

Original Article

Law allows Illinois to take action on climate change

The State of Illinois repealed the Kyoto Protocol Act of 1998 that limited state action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Now they’re ready to move forward in taking on climate change at the state level.

Original Article

Eight arrested as police seize refrigerant worth €500,000

And on the battlefront of the F-Gas black market trade, a series of police raids in Spain netted more than 225 cylinders of stolen refrigerant. A group of thieves burglarized 12 different businesses.

Original Article

If Carbon Offsets Require Forests to Stay Standing, What Happens When the Amazon Is on Fire?

Next month, California will decide whether to support a plan for tropical forest carbon offsets, a measure that could allow companies off some of their greenhouse gas emissions by paying people in countries like Brazil to preserve trees. But are they too vulnerable to politics and corruption to be effective?

Original Article


That concludes this month's HVAC/Roundup! If you haven't already, be sure to subscribe to our weekly updates. Have a great week!


 

Topics: Refrigerant Compliance, HVAC News Roundups, Refrigerant Management, compliance, climate change, Regulation, HFCs, legislation, climate leadership

Jennifer Brosius

Written by Jennifer Brosius